02 9 / 2014

"The net worth of the average black household in the United States is $6,314, compared with $110,500 for the average white household, according to 2011 census data. The gap has worsened in the last decade, and the United States now has a greater wealth gap by race than South Africa did during apartheid. (Whites in America on average own almost 18 times as much as blacks; in South Africa in 1970, the ratio was about 15 times.)"

01 9 / 2014

mynaturalsistas:

But are you paying attention to what’s going on??? My heart is so heavy….. so heavy…
An attorney for the family of John Crawford III, the man fatally shot by police in an Ohio Walmart store, says surveillance video contradicts the police department’s version of events. Officers say Crawford refused to drop the pellet gun he was holding, but the video allegedly shows them gunning him down “on sight.”
Crawford, 22, was shopping at the Beavercreek, Ohio store on Aug. 5 whenpolice responded to another customer’s report that Crawford was carrying an AR-15 rifle. He was actually holding a pellet air rifle he had just picked up from a shelf in the store’s toy department.
Attorney Michael Wright says he viewed surveillance video that shows Crawford was facing away from the cops and talking to his girlfriend on the phone when police spotted him, and didn’t have the toy gun raised. Hetold WDTN Crawford probably didn’t see or hear the officers before he was shot.
"John was doing nothing wrong in Walmart, nothing more, nothing less than shopping,"Wright said, according to Reuters.
#johncrawford #rip #justice #dontshoot

mynaturalsistas:

But are you paying attention to what’s going on??? My heart is so heavy….. so heavy…

An attorney for the family of John Crawford III, the man fatally shot by police in an Ohio Walmart store, says surveillance video contradicts the police department’s version of events. Officers say Crawford refused to drop the pellet gun he was holding, but the video allegedly shows them gunning him down “on sight.”

Crawford, 22, was shopping at the Beavercreek, Ohio store on Aug. 5 whenpolice responded to another customer’s report that Crawford was carrying an AR-15 rifle. He was actually holding a pellet air rifle he had just picked up from a shelf in the store’s toy department.

Attorney Michael Wright says he viewed surveillance video that shows Crawford was facing away from the cops and talking to his girlfriend on the phone when police spotted him, and didn’t have the toy gun raised. Hetold WDTN Crawford probably didn’t see or hear the officers before he was shot.

"John was doing nothing wrong in Walmart, nothing more, nothing less than shopping,"Wright said, according to Reuters.

#johncrawford #rip #justice #dontshoot

(via meltingdoll)

31 8 / 2014

(Source: busbyway, via marykatewiles)

31 8 / 2014

geckopirateship:

harlotan:

10/10 WOULD PURCHASE

We have taken this nerd’s whiny post and made something magical.

(Source: lostcitycomics, via battledad)

31 8 / 2014

toastyhat:

FINISHED PART TWO TODAY and it’s a bit early to get hype but I think everyone should anyway. uvu So I put together all the gifs I’ve posted so far plus one extra as a treat.

Previously: The Signless’s Story

Next up: The Summoner’s Story

31 8 / 2014

If you don’t believe that racism in the job market is real, then please read this article by Yolanda Spivey.  Spivey, who was seeking work in the insurance industry, found that she wasn’t getting any job offers.  But as an experiment, she changed her name to Bianca White, to see if employers would respond differently.  You’ll be shocked and amazed by her phenomenal story. 

Before I begin, let me quote the late, great, Booker T. Washington who said, “Of all forms of slavery there is none that is so harmful and degrading as that form of slavery which tempts one human being to hate another by reason of his race or color.”

For two years, I have been unemployed.   In the beginning, I applied to more than three hundred open positions in the insurance industry—an industry that I’ve worked in for the previous ten years.  Not one employer responded to my resume.  So, I enrolled back into college to finish my degree. After completing school this past May, I resumed my search for employment and was quite shocked that I wasn’t getting a single response.   I usually applied for positions advertised on the popular website Monster.com. I’d used it in the past and have been successful in obtaining jobs through it.

Two years ago, I noticed that Monster.com had added a “diversity questionnaire” to the site.  This gives an applicant the opportunity to identify their sex and race to potential employers.  Monster.com guarantees that this “option” will not jeopardize your chances of gaining employment.  You must answer this questionnaire in order to apply to a posted position—it cannot be skipped.  At times, I would mark off that I was a Black female, but then I thought, this might be hurting my chances of getting employed, so I started selecting the “decline to identify” option instead.  That still had no effect on my getting a job.  So I decided to try an experiment:  I created a fake job applicant and called her Bianca White.

First, I created an email account and resume for Bianca.  I kept the same employment history and educational background on her resume that was listed on my own. But I removed my home phone number, kept my listed cell phone number, and changed my cell phone greeting to say, “You have reached Bianca White.  Please leave a message.” Then I created an online Monster.com account, listed Bianca as a White woman on the diversity questionnaire, and activated the account.

That very same day, I received a phone call.  The next day, my phone line and Bianca’s email address, were packed with potential employers calling for an interview.  I was stunned.  More shocking was that some employers, mostly Caucasian-sounding women, were calling Bianca more than once, desperate to get an interview with her.  All along, my real Monster.com account was open and active; but, despite having the same background as Bianca, I received no phone calls.    Two jobs actually did email me and Bianca at the same time.  But they were commission only sales positions.  Potential positions offering a competitive salary and benefits all went to Bianca.

At the end of my little experiment, (which lasted a week), Bianca White had received nine phone calls—I received none.  Bianca had received a total of seven emails, while I’d only received two, which again happen to have been the same emails Bianca received. Let me also point out that one of the emails that contacted Bianca for a job wanted her to relocate to a different state, all expenses paid, should she be willing to make that commitment.  In the end, a total of twenty-four employers looked at Bianca’s resume while only ten looked at mines.

Is this a conspiracy, or what? I’m almost convinced that White Americans aren’t suffering from disparaging unemployment rates as their Black counterpart because all the jobs are being saved for other White people.

My little experiment certainly proved a few things.  First, I learned that answering the diversity questionnaire on job sites such as Monster.com’s may work against minorities, as employers are judging whom they hire based on it.  Second, I learned to suspect that resumes with ethnic names may go into the wastebasket and never see the light of day.

Other than being chronically out of work, I embarked on this little experiment because of a young woman I met while I was in school.  She was a twenty-two-year-old Caucasian woman who, like myself, was about to graduate.  She was so excited about a job she had just gotten with a well-known sporting franchise.  She had no prior work experience and had applied for a clerical position, but was offered a higher post as an executive manager making close to six figures.  I was curious to know how she’d been able to land such a position.  She was candid in telling me that the human resource person who’d hired her just “liked” her and told her that she deserved to be in a higher position.  The HR person was also Caucasian.

Another reason that pushed me to do this experiment is because of the media. There’s not a day that goes by in which I fail to see a news program about how tough the job market is.  Recently, while I was watching a report on underemployed and underpaid Americans, I saw a middle aged White man complaining that he was making only $80,000 which was $30,000 less than what he was making before.  I thought to myself that in this economy, many would feel they’d hit the jackpot if they made 80K a year.

In conclusion, I would like to once again quote the late, great, Booker T. Washington when he said, “You can’t hold a man down without staying down with him.”

The more America continues to hold back great candidates based on race, the more our economy is going to stay in a rut.  We all need each other to prosper, flourish, and to move ahead.

(Source: onlyblackgirl, via meltingdoll)

31 8 / 2014

leseanthomas:

Probably the greatest, comprehensive analysis on one of the most important film makers in animation gone too soon, and my direct influence in storyboard/visual storytelling in animation, the late great Kon Satoshi.

Rest in Power, Kon-san!

30 8 / 2014

fruitprint:

goodsmilecompanyus:

Nendoroid Halloween Miku! First on sale at Miku Expo this October in LA and NYC! For those in Osaka see her in person first at the Magical Mirai event!
-Mamitan <3

nextlevelgoogly

Okay this is adorable but what’s with the candy cane???

fruitprint:

goodsmilecompanyus:

Nendoroid Halloween Miku! First on sale at Miku Expo this October in LA and NYC! For those in Osaka see her in person first at the Magical Mirai event!

-Mamitan <3

nextlevelgoogly

Okay this is adorable but what’s with the candy cane???

(Source: goodsmilecompanyus, via nextlevelgoogly)

30 8 / 2014

atomic-glitter:

theroguefeminist:

dopeworldemmanuel:

This what some of you guys missed when watching the Anaconda video by Nicki Minaj

wow this analysis is so goodthis also makes the parallel between drake in the video and shinji actually have substance when you think about it

What’s funny is that people are so full of it. They accuse her of making shallow 2-dimensional music, so they must be pretty damn deep and analytical, right? WRONG, because as soon as they see asses shaking, they’ve already made up their minds. They’ve missed everything this person is saying because they’re the ones who are shallow. The only place where these people could ever truly be considered analytical is within the confides of their own minds.

Hmm. I finally watched the music video (and then went and looked up the lyrics) and I don&#8217;t agree with this analysis. DISCLAIMER I AM IN NO WAY A FEMINIST SCHOLAR. Also, I actually do like this song (and Nicki Minaj in general). But let&#8217;s think about this.
What a woman personally feels powerful doing is not necessarily something that is &#8216;feminist&#8217; and &#8216;empowering to women in general&#8217;. For example, I might feel powerful when I stride through the office in 4&#8221; heels, but that doesn&#8217;t make heels automatically feminist. And it&#8217;s important to note that my association of heels (which make my legs look good, but are harder to walk in and less comfortable than flats) with power can in fact be linked to profoundly non-feminist ideas that women&#8217;s power is inextricably dependent on their beauty and sex appeal.
The point of Anaconda, particularly when you combine the song and the video, is that Nicki Minaj allows herself to be objectified for her own benefit. And she clearly feels powerful when doing so. Which is fine!
This is not some new super-dark-feminist powerplay concept. It&#8217;s not a new idea AT ALL. I mean&#8230;that&#8217;s what mistresses/courtesans have basically always done? Been beautiful and sexy and traded their sexuality and sexual objectification for material support?
Is it feminist? Mmm. In a perfectly egalitarian world, I would say it&#8217;s a neutral choice (although we can have the debate about the destigmatization of sex work versus the downsides of a transactional model of sex and relationships, etc. etc.) But in a world where women are so often told that their ONLY power and ONLY value is their physical beauty and their sexuality, I am hesitant of any message that boils down to, &#8220;gosh, my beauty and sexuality gives me power!&#8221;.
Also, let&#8217;s be real, for all the OP&#8217;s talk of Nicki &#8216;overpowering&#8217; these men, the position of &#8216;he&#8217;ll buy me stuff so long as he find me suitably sexually appealing and available&#8217; is not necessarily a powerful position for a woman to be in. Absent other factors, it is in fact a fairly precarious position. (Now, Nicki is also a talented performer, a smart businesswoman, and wealthy in her own right. But the song isn&#8217;t about that. It&#8217;s primarily about the power of her sexuality.)
The way people frame the last scene is both disturbing and DEEPLY hilarious to me.
Hilarious because: this is basically a strip club scenario, y&#8217;all. Nothing wrong with that! But we have this guy in street clothes who has not made any particular effort with his appearance and is literally doing no work. He is getting a lap dance from a gorgeous woman who is crawling around on the floor and rubbing her body against him and twerking and grinding on him, all while wearing a sexy outfit and four-inch spike heels. And yet this is supposedly about her desires and her power? No.
In other words: the only possible sexual enjoyment she&#8217;s getting out of it is looking good/sexy FOR HIM and doing things that HE finds sexually appealing.
Disturbing because: people are making such a big deal of &#8216;he touches her, she pushes his hand away and walks off, and he&#8217;s &#8220;paralyzed&#8221; and &#8220;helpless&#8221;.&#8217; How can I put this delicately&#8230; REFRAINING FROM CONTINUING TO TOUCH A WOMAN WHO HAS MADE IT CLEAR SHE DOES NOT WANT TO BE TOUCHED IS NOT A FUCKING NEXT-LEVEL SUPER-FEMINIST POWER PLAY THAT RENDERS A MAN HELPLESS. IT IS BASIC GODDAMN RESPECT FOR CONSENT HOLY SHIT. This idea that &#8220;a woman not having sex with/behaving in the exact sexual way towards a man that he would like&#8221; is &#8220;the woman showing her power over the man&#8221; (rather than, you know, having boundaries like every human does) is creepy on a number of levels.
I like the song. I find it interesting. I like that Nicki makes it clear she also pursues guys for sex (yay for greater cultural acceptance that women do like, enjoy, and seek out sexual satisfaction!) and I did find the banana-shredding moment to be a nice inversion of the tropes she&#8217;s playing with here. But I can&#8217;t get behind the idea that the song has some big new subversive super-feminist message, because it just doesn&#8217;t.

atomic-glitter:

theroguefeminist:

dopeworldemmanuel:

This what some of you guys missed when watching the Anaconda video by Nicki Minaj

wow this analysis is so good
this also makes the parallel between drake in the video and shinji actually have substance when you think about it

What’s funny is that people are so full of it. They accuse her of making shallow 2-dimensional music, so they must be pretty damn deep and analytical, right? WRONG, because as soon as they see asses shaking, they’ve already made up their minds. They’ve missed everything this person is saying because they’re the ones who are shallow. The only place where these people could ever truly be considered analytical is within the confides of their own minds.

Hmm. I finally watched the music video (and then went and looked up the lyrics) and I don’t agree with this analysis. DISCLAIMER I AM IN NO WAY A FEMINIST SCHOLAR. Also, I actually do like this song (and Nicki Minaj in general). But let’s think about this.

  • What a woman personally feels powerful doing is not necessarily something that is ‘feminist’ and ‘empowering to women in general’. For example, I might feel powerful when I stride through the office in 4” heels, but that doesn’t make heels automatically feminist. And it’s important to note that my association of heels (which make my legs look good, but are harder to walk in and less comfortable than flats) with power can in fact be linked to profoundly non-feminist ideas that women’s power is inextricably dependent on their beauty and sex appeal.
  • The point of Anaconda, particularly when you combine the song and the video, is that Nicki Minaj allows herself to be objectified for her own benefit. And she clearly feels powerful when doing so. Which is fine!
  • This is not some new super-dark-feminist powerplay concept. It’s not a new idea AT ALL. I mean…that’s what mistresses/courtesans have basically always done? Been beautiful and sexy and traded their sexuality and sexual objectification for material support?
  • Is it feminist? Mmm. In a perfectly egalitarian world, I would say it’s a neutral choice (although we can have the debate about the destigmatization of sex work versus the downsides of a transactional model of sex and relationships, etc. etc.) But in a world where women are so often told that their ONLY power and ONLY value is their physical beauty and their sexuality, I am hesitant of any message that boils down to, “gosh, my beauty and sexuality gives me power!”.
  • Also, let’s be real, for all the OP’s talk of Nicki ‘overpowering’ these men, the position of ‘he’ll buy me stuff so long as he find me suitably sexually appealing and available’ is not necessarily a powerful position for a woman to be in. Absent other factors, it is in fact a fairly precarious position. (Now, Nicki is also a talented performer, a smart businesswoman, and wealthy in her own right. But the song isn’t about that. It’s primarily about the power of her sexuality.)
  • The way people frame the last scene is both disturbing and DEEPLY hilarious to me.
  • Hilarious because: this is basically a strip club scenario, y’all. Nothing wrong with that! But we have this guy in street clothes who has not made any particular effort with his appearance and is literally doing no work. He is getting a lap dance from a gorgeous woman who is crawling around on the floor and rubbing her body against him and twerking and grinding on him, all while wearing a sexy outfit and four-inch spike heels. And yet this is supposedly about her desires and her power? No.
  • In other words: the only possible sexual enjoyment she’s getting out of it is looking good/sexy FOR HIM and doing things that HE finds sexually appealing.
  • Disturbing because: people are making such a big deal of ‘he touches her, she pushes his hand away and walks off, and he’s “paralyzed” and “helpless”.’ How can I put this delicately… REFRAINING FROM CONTINUING TO TOUCH A WOMAN WHO HAS MADE IT CLEAR SHE DOES NOT WANT TO BE TOUCHED IS NOT A FUCKING NEXT-LEVEL SUPER-FEMINIST POWER PLAY THAT RENDERS A MAN HELPLESS. IT IS BASIC GODDAMN RESPECT FOR CONSENT HOLY SHIT. This idea that “a woman not having sex with/behaving in the exact sexual way towards a man that he would like” is “the woman showing her power over the man” (rather than, you know, having boundaries like every human does) is creepy on a number of levels.

I like the song. I find it interesting. I like that Nicki makes it clear she also pursues guys for sex (yay for greater cultural acceptance that women do like, enjoy, and seek out sexual satisfaction!) and I did find the banana-shredding moment to be a nice inversion of the tropes she’s playing with here. But I can’t get behind the idea that the song has some big new subversive super-feminist message, because it just doesn’t.

(via meltingdoll)

30 8 / 2014

toastyhat:

lyricallyicarus:

Read More

bless, this is great

YES.

YES THANK YOU.

(I haven’t posted about this song because everyone seems to love it but…I don’t find the original body-positive at all. Less because of the ‘skinny b*tch’ line - I’m not a fan of judging any woman’s looks/body size, but I also don’t think ‘skinny shaming’ is the new big problem in body positivity - and more because the overall tone of the song is ‘I’m okay…because straight dudes want to bone me’. Which is, uh, not really body positive? That’s just patriarchy.)